Jim Paulsen

THE BOND MARKET IS DRIVING THE BUS

Stocks opened sharply lower today (Dow -590 pts; SPX -2.1%). Financials and energy are leading the market lower, down by over 3% in early trading. The only sector in the green is utilities, up .4%. The SPX is still about 1.5% higher than it fell on Monday August 5th, so this is not even the worst day for stocks this month. Machine trading has taken over in reaction to falling yields in the bond market, and also lower trade volume. The VIX Index climbed back to 21, but that’s pretty tame compared with the spike above 35 we saw last December. As opposed to yesterday, everyone wants to be first to call the next recession. Scanning Bloomberg headlines, we see the following:

“Bond Panic Pummels Banks with Global Recession Fears…”

“Countdown to Catastrophe? The Yield Curve and Stock Bull Markets”

“Recession Worries Pile Up for the Battered Global Economy”


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

FED STIMULUS WHETHER WE NEED IT OR NOT

The stock market jumped at the open after the Federal Reserve rate cut yesterday. At the moment, the Dow is up 300 pts and the SPX is up 1%. The tech sector (+2.2%) is leading the way, along with communications (+1.3%) and consumer staples (+1.2%). Financials are lagging—up a mere .3%--in the wake of the rate cut. Strangely enough, the dollar strengthened after the Fed cut, probably because other central banks around the world (i.e. Europe, China) are expected to pursue stimulus more aggressively than the US Fed in the near future. So commodities are mostly trading lower today. WTI crude sank 2.7% to trade around $57/barrel after a report confirming a rebound in US production levels (12.2 million barrels per day). Traders are saying the world is well supplied. In addition, US and Chinese trade negotiators parted ways after accomplishing nothing this week and traders are using that as an excuse to sell. Bonds are up in price, down in yield today. From short-term to long-term, from corporates to Treasuries, the bond market is up across the board. The 10-year Treasury Note yield fell back to 1.95%, matching the lowest level going back to November 2016.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

RELIEF RALLY

Stocks opened higher this morning in an attempt to recover from a week-long 5% correction. The Dow is currently up 219 pts and the SPX is up 1.25%. Ten of eleven market sectors are in the green, led by tech (+1.9%), financials (+1.5%) and energy (1.7%). The VIX Index—a common gauge of fear among traders—fell back to 18.5. Oil prices also recovered after a series of attacks on Saudi oil tankers and pumping stations, presumably by Iran in retaliation for trade sanctions. WTI crude is back up around $61.80/barrel. Bonds are little changed this morning. The 10-year Treasury yield edged up to 2.42%.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

WHERE TO NEXT?

Stocks opened slightly lower this morning. The Dow is currently down 50 points and the SPX is down .1%. Financials (+.3%) and industrials (+.5%) are bouncing back from yesterday’s declines. On the other hand, healthcare, energy and real estate sectors are in the red. WTI crude oil fell back to $63.50/barrel in early trading. Most other commodities are down as well, partly due to a strengthening US dollar. Bonds are also trading lower as yields tick higher. The 10-year Treasury yield bounced back up to 2.49%. Only junk bonds are holding flat.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

COOLER HEADS ARE PREVAILING

Stocks opened sharply higher today, recovering from last week’s dip. The Dow is currently up 265 pts and the SPX is up .9%. All eleven major market sectors are the in green, led by energy (+1.7%) and tech (+1.3%). European stock markets are poised to close roughly .5% higher, and most of Asia was up overnight. Commodities are moving with stocks. WTI crude oil climbed back to $60/barrel. Most of today’s stock rally is owed to the fact that bonds are finally selling off. Investors have fretted about the fact that Treasury bond yields have fallen back to 14-month lows, suggesting that perhaps the bull market has come to an end. In fact, today CNBC’s Bob Pisani said that the dividing line among investors is whether or not one believes an economic recession is imminent in 2020.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

RETURN OF THE FED PUT

RETURN OF THE FED PUT

RETURN OF THE FED PUT

Stocks surged at the open this morning following yesterday’s Fed meeting. The SPX is up .8% and the Nasdaq is up 1.4%. Only the Dow is lagging a bit, down 6 points. The communications services sector shot up nearly 4%. Most other sectors are in the green as well, with the notable exceptions of financials and materials. Oil prices continue to recover, with WTI crude back above $55/barrel. Copper is now up over 5% this month, signaling some optimism over a trade deal with China. Bonds, strangely enough, are uniformly higher as well. The iShares 20+Year Treasury Bond ETF (TLT) is up .8% in early trading, and the SPDR High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) is up .4%. It is rather unusual to see stocks, commodities and bonds all trading higher on the same day.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

December 27, 2018

December 27, 2018

The major stock market averages lurched lower in early trading. The Dow is currently down 359 pts and the SPX is about 1.7% lower. The energy sector—down 2%--is the worst-performing. Most sectors are down more than 1% in early trading. The VIX Index—a common gauge of fear among traders—is back up around 33. European stock markets fell between 1.5% and 3% today. Asian markets were mixed overnight. The dollar is weaker today (and so far this month). WTI crude is trading back down around $45/barrel.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

October 12, 2018

October 12, 2018

The major stock market averages rebounded today at the open, but don’t expect it to last in front of a weekend. The Dow is currently up 87 pts and the SPX is up .7%. The market is, in technical terms, temporarily oversold. As of yesterday’s close, two-thirds of the S&P 500 was in correction territory (i.e. down 10% or more). At the moment, technology and consumer discretionary sectors are up over 1.3%. They took the brunt of selling over the last week. Most sectors are joining in the relief rally, save financials, energy, industrials and utilities. Despite some decent earnings announcements today, traders aren’t buying the banks. The VIX Index drifted down to 22 from 25 yesterday. European markets also gapped up at the open but are now poised to close down slightly. The bond market is mostly unchanged today. The 5-year and 10-year Treasury note yields are hovering around 3.0% and 3.15%, respectively. The yield curve steepened significantly over the past week but isn’t doing much today.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

October 11, 2018

October 11, 2018

The major stock market averages opened higher but quickly gave way. The Dow is now down 230 pts and the S&P 500 Index (SPX) is down 1% on the session. This is follow-through from yesterday’s rout, when the SPX gave up about 3%. Unlike yesterday, however, the tech sector is actually up slightly, whereas utilities and real estate sectors are down well over 1%. The energy sector is down 1.6% in early trading as oil prices retreat. The SPX is now about 6.6% off of its all-time high of about 2940. This morning, the index pulled back to a long-term support level of about 2,745. If today’s low holds, this will be viewed as a very orderly mini-correction.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

October 8, 2018

October 8, 2018

Stocks sank at the open today, following on Friday’s declines. The Dow is currently down 190 pts and the SPX is down .65%. Weirdly, utilities, real estate and consumer staples sectors are up sharply today while the rest of the market is down. I say that because the primary concern for most investors over the last week has been rapidly rising interest rates. And it is axiomatic that the sectors listed above don’t typically fare well when rates are rising. European markets will close down about 1% as the Italian banking sector looks weaker. Asian markets were also down overnight. The VIX Index—a gauge of fear among traders—jumped to 17.4 today, the highest in a little over a month. The dollar is stronger against a basket of foreign currencies and commodities are mixed. WTI crude oil is down around $74/barrel. Gold and copper are also lower on the day.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

July 25, 2018

July 25, 2018

Stocks opened mixed (Dow -75 pts; SPX +.17%). This is essentially the mirror image of yesterday’s trade. Utilities, real estate and consumer staples are in the green, whereas industrials, financials and consumer discretionary sectors are trading lower. It’s just more of the same back-and-forth without a discernible trend. Whereas European markets were up nicely yesterday, they’re poised to close down today. Bloomberg’s Macro Man column calls it “unremarkably quiet” as a result of “global confusion.” Anyway, commodities are trading a bit higher today (gold, copper, oil). WTI crude oil is trading flat at $68.60/barrel. Bonds are mostly unchanged. The 5-year Treasury yield, after a brief run higher last week, is sitting at 2.81% and the 10-year yield dipped to 2.94%.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

May 16, 2018

The major stock market averages opened mixed this morning (Dow flat; SPX +.17%). Cyclical sectors—consumer discretion, materials, tech, industrials—are leading the way. Utilities and real estate, however, are extending declines. Emerging markets are up 1% (now flat on the year). The VIX Index is trading back down under 14. Trade volume is light. The dollar is up again today and commodities are mixed. WTI crude oil is down .4% to trade around $71/barrel. And by the way, the DOE says total US oil production is up around 10.7 million barrels per day—a record high. Bonds are selling off again. The 5-year Treasury yield is up around 2.92% and the 10-year yield is up around 3.08%. 


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

April 3, 2018

Stocks opened higher today, reversing yesterday’s rout. The Dow and SPX are currently up 113 pts and .4%, respectively. All eleven market sectors are in the green, led by consumer staples (+.8%) and materials (+.7%). In addition, small-caps and emerging markets are up between .7% and 1% in early trading. The VIX Index is back down to 22 after briefly touching 25 yesterday . WTI crude oil is trading back up to $63.40/barrel. Bonds are selling off with yields moving higher. The 5-year Treasury note yield is back up to 2.6% and the 10-year is up around 2.78%. The yield curve has flattened somewhat over the last couple of weeks, meaning that long-term inflation expectations are not keeping up with short-term Fed rate hike expectations. The difference between the 2-year and 10-year yields fell back to 50 basis points (or .50%). That’s the smallest spread since the fall of 2007.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

March 7, 2018

Stocks opened lower today. The Dow is currently down 170 pts and the SPX is down .47%. The dip is not surprising considering Gary Cohn’s resignation as the president’s chief economic advisor yesterday. Most of America couldn’t care less, but the investor class is clearly worried. At the moment, most sectors are trading lower led by energy, industrials and consumer discretionary. REITs and telecoms are trading modestly higher. By the way, year-to-date if you’ve not invested in consumer discretionary, financials and info tech sectors, you likely haven’t made money. Despite the return of volatility, cyclical sectors are performing well. Today, the VIX Index is up slightly to trade around 18.5. Commodities are mostly lower with WTI crude oil down around $62.10/barrel. Oil has traded in the range of $59-$66 this year. Bonds are mostly unchanged. The 5-year and 10-year Treasury yields are holding at 2.64% and 2.87%, respectively.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

February 16, 2018

The major stock market averages opened higher again today (Dow +150 pts; SPX +.6%). Thus far, the SPX has retraced about 60% of the damage done in the recent correction. Today, telecoms, healthcare and utilities are the best performers. This is really just catch-up as interest rates fall back a bit. The VIX Index is down around 18, providing a bit more confidence that the correction is really over. The dollar is stronger today (but still down 3% on the year). WTI crude oil is up around $61.70/barrel. Remember, a weaker dollar usually helps commodity prices. Bonds are trading higher as yields tick down. By the way, the 10-year Treasury yield hit 2.91% yesterday, the highest since Jan. 2014. 


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

January 23, 2018

Stocks opened modestly higher this morning (Dow +15 pts; SPX +.25%). There’s no real pattern among the eleven market sectors. Tech is up .7% and consumer discretionary is up .5%. But the rest of the cyclicals (energy, financials, materials) are down. And the most interest rate sensitive sectors—utilities, real estate—are up over 1% in early trading. The VIX Index is up around 11.4. It has been over 11 for about a week now. But February VIX futures aren’t much higher at 11.9. So expected volatility is still pretty low. The dollar is weaker this morning and commodities are mostly higher. WTI crude oil up around $64.58/barrel. Bonds yields are ticking lower after a huge run-up since September. The 5-year and 10-year US Treasury note yields are trading at 2.42% and 2.62%, respectively.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

December 18, 2017

The major stock market averages gapped up at the open (Dow +175 pts; SPX +.6%). Energy and materials sectors are in the lead, up over 1%. Utilities, on the other hand, is the only sector in the red. Small-caps are surging 1.2% on tax reform optimism. The VIX Index remains below 10 and VIX January futures are trading around 11.3. So there’s not much fear out there. European markets are poised to close up over 1% today and Asia was up overnight. Including the effects of currency, the Hang Seng Index is up 31% this year and the Euro Stoxx 50 Index is up 23%. Commodities are mostly in the green today, with WTI crude oil up around $57.50/barrel. Bonds are mostly unchanged, however. The 5-year and 10-year Treasury bond yields are trading at 2.15% and 2.37%, respectively.

According to Bloomberg, both the House of Representatives and the Senate are planning on midweek votes to pass the final version of the tax reform bill. This morning, CNBC interviewed Jim Paulsen of the Leuthold Group, who said passage of the tax bill is already priced into the stock market and this looks like a “buy the rumor and sell ultimately on the news” event. Corporate earnings will be boosted by the tax cut, but the market’s P/E multiple (20x) is rather high. And with unemployment three-tenths away from a 50-year low, interest rates probably need to reset higher. That’s “where the tension might turn” in 2018. Typically, stock market P/E ratios fall when interest rates rise.

Analysts at Goldman Sachs expect another good year for stocks in 2018. The firm’s chief US equity strategist projects the S&P 500 Index will climb another 7% over the next 12 months. And he doesn’t expect a return of volatility.  


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

October 16, 2017

Stocks opened modestly higher this morning (Dow +35 pts; SPX flat), led by telecoms, banks, biotechs and semiconductors. Interest rate sensitive sectors (utilities, real estate) are in the red. The VIX Index still treading water under 10. WTI crude oil is trading back up over $51/barrel and that is helping sustain the stock rally. Bonds are trading a bit lower today as yields resume the march higher. The 5-year Treasury yield is currently at 1.93% and the 10-year yield edged up to 2.29%.


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

September 18, 2017

Stocks opened higher this morning ( Dow +82 pts; SPX +.25%). Gains are broadbased, led by semiconductors, banks, and industrials. Only real estate and utilities are in the red. This is now officially the second-longest stock market rally in US history. The S&P 500 Index is up about 270% since March 2009 without a major correction (that is, more than 20% decline). Commodities are mixed in early trading. Oil is down 1% to trade around $49.30/barrel. Gold is down 1% today but has risen about 13% this year. Bonds are selling off as yields tick higher. The 5-year Treasury yield spiked to 1.83%. The 10-year Treasury yield is up to 2.23%. Remember, the 10-year was just over 2% a week ago, so this is a big move in rates. Last week’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) report suggested inflation is rising. And by the way, wholesale inflation is also picking up a bit. 


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.

August 4, 2017

Stocks opened higher after the monthly jobs report. The Dow is up 20 pts and the SPX is up .15%. Financials, tech and materials are leading the way. And as you would expect on a day when interest rates rise, utilities, telecom and consumer staples are falling behind. The VIX Index is back down under 10 today, and European stock markets are poised to close up 1%+. The dollar is sharply higher, also due to the jobs report. And crude oil is trying to make another run toward $50/barrel. Bonds are modestly lower in price as yield tick higher. The 10-year Treasury yield is sitting at 2.28%. I don’t want to make too much of this; remember, the 10-year yield is right in the middle of its trading range going back several months. 


*The foregoing content reflects the author's personal opinions which may not coincide with the opinions of the firm, and are subject to change at any time without notice. Content provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be used or construed as investment advice or a recommendation regarding the purchase or sale of any security. There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions, or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Indices are not available for direct investment. Any investor who attempts to mimic the performance of an index would incur fees and expenses which would reduce returns. All investing involves risk. Asset allocation and diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Finally, please understand that–as with other social media–if you leave a comment, it will be made public.